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When optimism and positivity is misconstrued as naivety

I am forever battling against this assumption that those who are realistic (even cynical and pessimistic) are more intelligent.

Wednesday night we attended the State Library of Victoria’s 2015 Stephen Murray-Smith Memorial lecture which was presented by feminist historian Dr. Clare Wright. During the lecture Clare reflected upon the 40 years since the publication of Anne Summers’ seminal text Damned Whores and God’s Police.

For me, the overall message of the lecture was one of celebration. Clare did make it clear that the journey is one of constant change, and the journey is by no means finished. However, I did appreciate that she focused upon the change brought about by the common woman’s strength, ingenuity and resilience.

I was surprised by the questions at the end, which attempted to draw Clare into a discussion about the concerns surrounding neo-liberal feminism. I get the impression that some attendees were looking for a roadmap of continued resistance in order to further the feminist cause as opposed to the reflection which the lecture was supposed to be. Some seemed frustrated by Clare’s unwillingness to be drawn into a finger-pointing exercise in relation to the unforeseen implications of the feminist movement.

For me, this was yet another instance of positivity being misconstrued as naivety. I have been warned many times against being too optimistic, as people would take me less seriously. I am forever battling against this assumption that those who are realistic (even cynical and pessimistic) are more intelligent.

Some attendees at Clare’s lecture might have found her presentation to be of more merit if she were to rail against the prevailing injustices against the female population. Personally however, I find no point whatsoever in beating our heads against walls and moaning about those who have taken feminism in a direction which we may not agree with.

Rather, let’s celebrate our past accomplishments and those common people who led a silent revolution and had an uncommon affect on history. In so doing, we bring back into focus the original spirit of feminism and spread an infectious joy in playing a small part in enacting change.

I guess what I am asking is this: If we had one room filled with optimists and another filled with pessimists, which would be the more likely to make a positive change in this world? I would say that the answer is bleeding obvious. But then again, I’ve been called ‘naïve’.

1 thought on “When optimism and positivity is misconstrued as naivety

  1. The need for a perceived struggle is part of the western narative, and group sounds like it has come together around the struggle narratives they create and share.

    I’d say the issue isn’t optimisim or pessimism related, but more an issue of how the community sees itself.

    My 2 pessimistic sense.

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